Yes, there has been a hiatus.

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Over the last month or so we have been overly busy getting a studio ready for Robyn, who will rebrand herself as Robyn Gale Photographer some time in the future.

In the process, I managed to brick two cellphones. Useful things, until they go away. Then… you miss essential communications until it is too late. As Bruce is quite ill, this is not going to happen. The phone is now a Motorola X…. and this is Bruce.

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And here are the other inhabitants of Casa Weka.

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Motorola X, processed in Google photos.

Koalas

I have held off on processing these for a while. The issue I had was sunlight: I was either in full sun or (since the Koalas sensibly sought the shade) in the dark and having to crank the iso up to get a sharpish image. These ones seemed to work.

Nikon v3 with 10 -100 zoom: Processed Darktable

The low end problem.

Tom Hogan has an ongoing discussion on Nikon and its problems. He notes that they probably make best of class Digital SLRs (particularly the D5 and D500) and their lenses are brilliant. But… they have lost the low end. No one buys small compact cameras.

Because we carry one. Consider this photo.

It was taken with my cellphone (Sony Xperia Z5) which has a 22 MP two thirds sensor camera with a reasonable sony lens: the photo was automatically loaded to google photos as a jpeg. I saw the scene, stopped, and took some shots. This one was processed in google photos.

The workflow here matters. I save the photos as raw and jpegs and export the jpegs. But I hardly ever, for casual shooting, look at the raw. I cannot adjust and expose for shadows as I can with a film or digital camera. If I had a DSLR, mirrorless or film camera with me I would have used them… but I was driving home after the gym, and I don’t carry such in my gym bag.

The good digital cameras have killed the small point and shoot Digital autofocus camera. And it is starting to leak into sports. Most of the crossfit videos that are uploaded (it is open season) are shot not with a video camera or Micro 4/3 or DSLR… but using a cellphone.

Even though the DSLR is better and a G4 or even a gopro would run rings around one. It is because uploading the files to judges via social media is seamless.

The best camera is the one you have with you. The best workflow is a simple one. Sony has this figured out at the low end, as does Apple, and Samsung. And Microsoft, and most generic Android phone makers.

The traditional camera makers have lost that market. They need not only be clearly and obviously better — in image noise and sharpness — they have to be as easy as Instagram. They are not.

Site stats.

I spent a fair amount of this month travelling, and I’m still processing photos. The traffic is… down. As expected

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Monthly Stats Report: 1 Feb – 28 Feb 2017

Project: Shattered Light

URL: http://pukeko.net.nz/photo

Summary

You can see the variation between wordpress and sitemeter fairly easily.

 

Page Loads

Unique Visits

First Time Visits

Returning Visits

Total

142

109

102

7

Average

5

4

4

0

On the usefulness of a CX sensor.

Yes, one of htese shots is the same as yesterday, same size… but instead of being taken with a D800 and a 0 mm lons, the other with a 10-100 CX lens that gives the equivalent of 300 mm reach.

A CX camera can shoot raw, you can use the same workflow, and it can, within likits produce good photos. But it is much lighter. The advantage of using the Nikon one series over the alternative (such as the Sony RX 100 camera) is that you can use a prime lens (there are fast ones) and a superzoom: you don’t have as many compromises with glass. And the glass, now that the V series is not being promoted, is becoming cheap. The system is smaller than the similar options for a micro 4/3 and as a little more pixels.

THis is my current travel solution: the previous one was a Ricoh GXR.

Pohutukawa and other flowers (and a cat)

We are in the process of unpacking, including pulling out the cameras. The Pro Photographer is thinking of when to upgrade her cameras. I am not. I’m still using a D800 as the main camera. Today I put on a second hand, ugly zoom (that was bought off a press photographer, with the hood held together by duct tape) and took it out into the rain, and shot all the photos but the one of the cat.

I was trying to get shots of the Pohutukawa flowers. This “The New Zealand Christmas Tree” normally flowers around Christmas. It is flowering a month late, even in the South: we are having a miserable summer, with snow on the hills in what should be the warmest time of the year. But the roses like it.

Slightly different processing: photos were imported using rapid photo downloader, which is lighter and faster, and then processed in Darktable. D800, F2.8 70 – 200 zoom.

Otago Harbour, cellphone.

These were taken using my cellphone tonight: one is a panorama based on multiple photos from the google photo system.

Xperia Z5 cellphone.

(And yes, I have better photos to process later, once the move to casa weka is complete)