Administration.

I have spent considerable time on my other sites, particularly dark brightness, to get it up and running, and now I am coming to this site and doing a few things.

  1. I lost all of dark brightness, but vaultpress bought it back. This is now installed.
  2. The A2 hosting plugins are in place.
  3. I have added NextGen Gallery as a trial: the paid versions of this look good but let’s see if it is compatible. It looks like it can handle larger photo posts, which will be useful here.

In the meantime, some analogue photos.

 

Old analogue #Filmisnotdead

I got an email from the Darkroom indicating that my scans there would be deleted, so I have been reviewing and downloading them. These are from 2016: I note that there were a lot of failures. I think most of them were shot with a mamiya 7.

Harrington Point.

On Sunday I carried an old Nikon One. This is often called a toy camera, but it is well engineered. Moreover, I was using a kit lens.

What I had was good light.

Autumnal flowers

It is the equinox, the hills are getting snow, and the last of the summer colour is going. Robyn has harvested the apples from the garden. We have lit our first fire for 2018. And I managed to get some of the last of the garden beauty, between showers.

Only two photos… the gallery (tiled at large size) will link to the big files. Which are 28MB or so, despite being taken with a 16 MP OM-10.

As the weather gets worse, there will be more analogue. I have film from summer to develop and scan.

Driftwood and snow.

We had a few days of cold and rainy weather. This translated to snow on the mountains, when we could see them

The photos were white balanced against the snow, and this prings out the golden haze of what should be late Summer. When you are supposed to find driftwood, but not snow.

At a crib.

There are two colloquial words that are regional in New Zealand. In the north island, a “bach” is a holiday home, generally simple, small and plain, and somewhat scenic. In the photo shoot I have a ruined bach. In the south island they are called cribs.

And they are dying, beucase the scenic areas now have subdivisions. This one is between two subdivisions, and will soon be no more.

Photos taken with Nikon one and Olympus OM-10 mark II. Processed in Darktable.

After Dinner photos

After dinner we dropped some rubbish off, and then went to Jacoh’s creek, where I managed to take some photos in the gallery. Then we drove up to a lookout, where we scouted for sunset photos.

On the way up we noticed that a lot of campervans were parked on a sandbar. Robyn and I drove there, below the usual water level for the lake, and took some more shots.

Half were taken with a 12 MP nikon V1, the other half with a 36 MP Nikon d800. Both are old cameras, and both are fairly good.

If you pixel peep you should be able to work out which is which.

Dublin Bay.

I don’t use my 50 mm (normal) lens very much. Perhaps I should.

But the reason I do not is that I get less photos per session, and a lot of missed shots.  Which is irritating. Particularly when the light changes.

Sunday walk, Dublin Bay, Lake Wanaka.

 

Fog and a seal.

I have just reviewed all the pictures from last weekend, and the highlights were catching the fog in the inner harbour and the coast behind the Otago peninsula.

And a seal.

I think the seal wins.